Tag Archives: vrops

vRealize Automation 7 Management Pack for vRealize Operations

If you’re an SDDC administrator, you probably already know about the power and operational visibility that vRealize Operations brings to your environment. With the newly-released vRealize Automation 7 Management Pack for vRealize Operations, that operational visibility can be extended to be tenant-aware and help monitor your vRA environment in a whole new way.

This new Management Pack gives you comprehensive visibility into both performance and capacity metrics of a vRA tenant’s business groups and underlying cloud infrastructure. By combining these new metrics with the custom dashboarding capabilities of vRealize Operations, you gain an unprecedented level of flexibility and insight when monitoring these complex environments.

The purpose of this post is to walk you through the implementation of this new Management Pack – so, let’s get right to it.

You can download the Management Pack from the VMware Solution Exchange here.

Part 1: Enabling vROps as your Metrics Provider

First, let’s review what you’ll see before you integrate vRA and vROps. Looking at the details of any deployed item, you can see the highlighted white space – space that can definitely be put to more productive use.

Item_Details_Before_Integration

Assuming you’re logged in as a vRA Tenant Administrator, click on the Administration tab, then the Reclamation button in the menu at the left. Select Metrics Provider and you’ll see the configuration panel for the vROps endpoint. Fill in the appropriate details for your vROps instance and click Test Connection. Once it succeeds, click Save.

Set_Up_Metrics_Provider

You will probably be prompted to accept the SSL certificate offered up by your vROps instance. Click OK to accept the certificate, provided you trust it!

Accept_vROps_Cert

Now, if you click on the Tenant Machines option to the left, you’ll be presented with a list of all of your provisioned machines. You can see that now there’s a Health status badge for each machine. In my case, the Health is reporting an “Immediate” (orange) status for many of my virtual machines, due to very heavy utilization in my lab. You can also see the average CPU, Memory and Network consumption for each machine – data pulled directly from vROps. This consumption data can be used directly from within this view to initiate reclamation requests. For example, if a VM was identified here as idle, the VM owner could be notified and the resources recovered.

Tenant_Machines_View

Click back to the Items tab and view the same object you looked at earlier. You will see that the white space now contains a vROps-driven Health badge, with information about any possible issues. When you’re ready, log out of your vRA instance.

Item_Details_After_Integration

Part 2: Configuring vRealize Automation

You’ll need to log in as  the default administrator for this next step – administrator@vsphere.local

Log_In_vRA_Default_Administrator

Click on the Administration tab, followed by the Tenants menu button at the left. Locate the Tenant that you plan to link vROps to and Edit it. In this example, I am modifying the vsphere.local Tenant.

Locate_Target_Tenant

Now, select the Local Users tab. Click the +New button to add a new user and fill in the requested details. In this case, my new username is “vropsmp” – and since we are creating this local user in the vsphere.local tenant, the full account is “vropsmp@vsphere.local“. Click OK and then Next.

Add_New_Local_User

This will place you on the Administrators tab. Using the Search boxes, find and add your new local account to both the Tenant Administrators and the IaaS Administrators role. Click Finish when you’re done, and then Log Out of vRA.

Assign_Tenant_Rights

Now you’ll need to log back in as your normal vRA Tenant Administrator to finish the configuration.

Log_In_vRA_Tenant_Admin

Click the Infrastructure tab, then Endpoints from the menu on the left. Select Fabric Groups from the sub-menu and then click to edit your Fabric Group. In this example, the Fabric Group is named Dev Cluster.

Navigate_To_Fabric_Groups

Search for and add your new local user to the list of Fabric Administrators. Remember, in this example the user is named vropsmp@vsphere.local. Click OK to save the Fabric Group.

Edit_Fabric_Group

Now, click on the Administration tab, followed by Users & Groups from  the menu on the left. Select the Directory Users and Groups sub-menu and search for your new local user. Click the user’s name to edit it.

Navigate_To_Directory_Users

In the list to the right titled “Add roles to this User“, scroll down until you find the Software Architect role. Select it and then click Finish to save the account.

Assign_Software_Architect_Role

Part 3: Configuring vRealize Operations

Once you’ve downloaded the new Management Pack (again, found here) you’ll need to import it into vROps and configure it to retrieve data from vRA.

Log in to vROps with an administrative user account.

Log_In_vROps

Click on the Administration tab, and ensure Solutions is selected. Click the + symbol to import a new Solution.

Import_New_Solution

Click the Browse button to select the downloaded Management Pack, then click Upload.

NOTE! If you already had the earlier vROps Management Pack for vRA installed, you may have to do a “force install” by selecting the first checkbox. This is because the version number scheme was changed, and vROps recognizes the NEW MP as being an OLDER version. This is normal, if a bit cumbersome.

Click Next when the upload is verified and you are ready to proceed.

Upload_New_Solution

Accept the EULA (after reading it carefully first, of course) and click Next again.

Accept_EULA

The installation will run for a while. When it shows “Completed”, click Finish.

Complete_Installation

Locate the new Management Pack in the list of Solutions and highlight it. Click the Configure icon (gears) to bring up the configuration dialog. Fill in a Display Name and Description as well as your vRA URL and the name of the Tenant you want to connect to. In this example, the Tenant is vsphere.local. Click the + sign to start setting up credentials next.

Configure_Solution_Basics

Fill in the credential details as shown – your SysAdmin should be the administrator@vsphere.local administrative account, and your SuperUser will be the local user you created at the beginning of these steps. In this example, that local user is vropsmp@vsphere.local. Click OK when you’re done.

Manage_Credential

Click the ‘Test Connection‘ button. You’ll be prompted with two SSL certificate dialogs – accept them both, if you trust the certificates. You see two because the Management Pack is communicating with both your core vRA appliance as well as your IaaS server(s).

Test_Connection_Accept_Cert_1

Accept_Cert_2

If you’ve set everything up properly, you’ll see a message like this one. Click OK.

Test_Successful

Click on Save Settings to save your adapter configuration. You’ll be prompted with a “Save Successful” dialog – click OK here as well – then click Close.

Save_Solution_Settings

If everything’s gone according to plan, you should now see that your Management Pack is configured and receiving data from your vRA instance.

Solution_Details

Part 4: Reviewing Dashboards

Now that all of the configuration is complete, you’re ready to start consuming the rich data exposed by your new integration. Click on the Home tab in vROps, followed by the drop-down arrow for the Dashboard List. Hover over the vRealize Automation sub-menu to see the 4 available default  dashboards.

Navigate_To_vRA_Dashboards

The vRealize Automation Overview dashboard shows information about the entire vRA instance – including component health and a whole host of metrics about each individual component of the instance. This is useful for troubleshooting and analyzing performance across your entire implementation of the vRA stack.

vRealize_Automation_Overview

The vR Automation Tenant Overview dashboard provides exactly that – an overview of the various risk and health metrics pertinent to each configured vRA Tenant.

vR_Automation_Tenant_Overview

The vR Automation Cloud Infrastructure Monitoring dashboard allows you to see what impact infrastructure issues are having on tenant virtual machines, and what outstanding alerts may be present for those machines and infrastructure.

vR_Automation_Cloud_Infrastructure_Monitoring

Finally, the vR Automation Top-N Dashboard provides highlight Top-N metrics, such as the most popular Blueprints, most wasteful Tenants, the Business Group with the most alerts, etc.

vR_Automation_Top-N_Dashboard

And, of course, all of the objects which are exposed by the Management Pack can be viewed in the vRealize Automation Environment view. These objects can all be referenced by Super Metrics, or custom dashboards, or scheduled reports – but those are all beyond the scope of this guide.

vRealize_Automation_Environment

That just about wraps it up – except, of course, for the most important part…

This post was brought to you by New Helvetia Brewing Company’s Mystery Airship 2.0 Imperial Chocolate Porter, brewed with Ginger Elizabeth’s Oaxacan Spicy Chocolate. This is quite possibly the single greatest beer I have ever tried – the darkness of the porter is supplemented by the brightness of the ginger and creamy feel of the chocolate. The flavors dance on your palate and then vanish in a fog of lingering, dark spice. I honestly think I found my desert island beer!

New_Helvetia_Ginger_Elizabeth_Porter

Happy Automating!

vRealize Operations Manager Content Pack for Log Insight

Get ready, ops-heads… another exciting announcement from the VMware team. There’s now a formal content pack for Log Insight that will allow the import and visualization of the logs from vRealize Operations Manager 6.x.

As an added bonus, if you are running vROps 6.0.1 or later – the Log Insight agent is already pre-installed on your appliance – all you have to do is configure it! If you’re on an earlier version, you can still manually install and configure the agent. Instructions for doing that can be found here.

Given the incredible volume and depth of the data that’s being imported and analyzed by this  content pack, the configuration file is pretty complex. The official installation notes are in a PDF format that was a little difficult to copy and paste all the elements from, so I’ve created a properly formatted file and attached it below.

There are a few tags you will need to change to make this work – I’ve included the tag names as well as the current find-and-replace value below so you can easily tailor the file to your needs. When you’re done, just save it as /var/lib/loginsight-agent/liagent.ini on each node and restart the Log Insight agent (by running /etc/init.d/liagentd restart)

Here’s a helpful screenshot of where you can find several of these parameters for your cluster nodes. Keep in mind that if you have a multi-tier deployment, you will need to customize the below config file for each node.

vRealize_Operations_Manager_Cluster_Administration
(Click the image for a larger version)

Here are the paramters that need to be changed:

  • hostname – this is the IP or FQDN of your Log Insight server. Note that this only needs to be changed in the [server] section at the top of the file, and not throughout the entire file. Below,  it is set to <YOUR LOGINSIGHT HOSTNAME HERE>
  • vmw_vr_ops_clustername – this is the *name* of your vRealize Operations cluster. This can be anything you like here and can be used to distinguish one cluster from another if you have multiples. Below, it is <YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>
  • vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole – this is the role that the node you are installing this file on fills. The choices are “Master“, “Replica“, “Data“, or “Remote Collector” – on a single-node installation, use Master. Below, it is set to Master. This value can be found on the Administration > Cluster Management page in the vRealize Operations Manager UI (see above image)
  • vmw_vr_ops_hostname – this is the hostname of your vRealize Operations Manager cluster. This hostname can also be found on the Administration > Cluster Management page in the vRealize Operations Manager UI (see above image). Below, it is set to <YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>
  • vmw_vr_ops_nodename – this is the node name of the node you are installing this file on. This name can be found on the Administration > Cluster Management page in the vRealize Operations Manager UI (see above image). Below, it is set to <YOUR NODE NAME HERE>

And here’s the config file itself:

; Client-side configuration of VMware Log Insight Agent
; See liagent-effective.ini for the actual configuration used by VMware Log Insight Agent

[server]
; Log Insight server hostname or ip address
; If omitted the default value is LOGINSIGHT
hostname=<YOUR LOGINSIGHT HOSTNAME HERE>

; Set protocol to use:
; cfapi - Log Insight REST API
; syslog - Syslog protocol
; If omitted the default value is cfapi
;
;proto=cfapi

; Log Insight server port to connect to. If omitted the default value is:
; for syslog: 512
; for cfapi without ssl: 9000
; for cfapi with ssl: 9543
;port=9000

;ssl - enable/disable SSL. Applies to cfapi protocol only.
; Possible values are yes or no. If omitted the default value is no.
;ssl=no

; Time in minutes to force reconnection to the server
; If omitted the default value is 30
;reconnect=30

[storage]
;max_disk_buffer - max disk usage limit (data + logs) in MB:
; 100 - 2000 MB, default 200
;max_disk_buffer=200

[logging]
;debug_level - the level of debug messages to enable:
;   0 - no debug messages
;   1 - trace essential debug messages
;   2 - verbose debug messages (will have negative impact on performace)
;debug_level=0

[filelog|messages]
directory=/var/log
include=messages;messages.?

[filelog|syslog]
directory=/var/log
include=syslog;syslog.?

[filelog|ANALYTICS-analytics]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"ANALYTICS","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log
include = analytics*.log*
exclude_fields=hostname

[filelog|COLLECTOR-collector]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"COLLECTOR","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log
include = collector.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3}

[filelog|COLLECTOR-collector_wrapper]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"COLLECTOR","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log
include = collector-wrapper.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\.\d{3}

[filelog|COLLECTOR-collector_gc]
directory = /data/vcops/log
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"COLLECTOR","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
include = collector-gc*.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\w]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\.\d{3}

[filelog|WEB-web]
directory = /data/vcops/log
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"WEB","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
include = web*.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3}

[filelog|GEMFIRE-gemfire]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"GEMFIRE","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log
include = gemfire*.log*
exclude_fields=hostname

[filelog|VIEW_BRIDGE-view_bridge]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps","vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"VIEW_BRIDGE","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log
include = view-bridge*.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3}

[filelog|VCOPS_BRIDGE-vcops_bridge]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps","vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"VCOPS_BRIDGE","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log
include = vcops-bridge*.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3}

[filelog|SUITEAPI-api]
directory = /data/vcops/log
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"SUITEAPI","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
include = api.log*;http_api.log*;profiling_api.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3}

[filelog|SUITEAPI-suite_api]
directory = /data/vcops/log/suite-api
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"SUITEAPI","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
include = *.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{2}-\w{3}-\d{4}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\.\d{3}

[filelog|ADMIN_UI-admin_ui]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"ADMIN_UI","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log/casa
include = *.log*;*_log*
exclude_fields=hostname

[filelog|CALL_STACK-call_stack]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps","vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"CALL_STACK", "vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>","vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master", "vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>","vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log/callstack
include = analytics*.txt;collector*.txt
exclude_fields=hostname

[filelog|TOMCAT_WEBAPP-tomcat_webapp]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps","vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"TOMCAT_WEBAPP","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log/product-ui
include = *.log*;*_log*
exclude_fields=hostname

[filelog|OTHER-other1]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"OTHER","vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master","vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log
include = aim*.log*;calltracer*.log*;casa.audit*.log*;distributed*.log*;hafailover*.log;his*.log*;installer*.log*;locktrace*.log*;opsapi*.log*;query-service-timer*.log*;queryprofile*.log*;vcopsConfigureRoles*.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3} 

[filelog|OTHER-other2]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"OTHER", "vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master", "vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log
include = env-checker.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{2}\D{1}\d{2}\D{1}\d{4}\s\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}

[filelog|OTHER-other3]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"OTHER", "vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master", "vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log
include = gfsh*.log*;HTTPPostAdapter*.log*;meta-gemfire*.log*;migration*.log*
exclude_fields=hostname

[filelog|OTHER-watchdog]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"OTHER", "vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master", "vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log/vcops-watchdog
include = vcops-watchdog.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3}

[filelog|ADAPTER-vmwareadapter]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"ADAPTER", "vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master", "vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log/adapters/VMwareAdapter
include = *.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3}

[filelog|ADAPTER-vcopsadapter]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"ADAPTER", "vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master", "vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log/adapters/VCOpsAdapter
include = *.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3}

[filelog|ADAPTER-openapiadapter]
tags = {"vmw_vr_ops_appname":"vROps", "vmw_vr_ops_logtype":"ADAPTER", "vmw_vr_ops_clustername":"<YOUR CLUSTER NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_clusterrole":"Master", "vmw_vr_ops_nodename":"<YOUR NODE NAME HERE>", "vmw_vr_ops_hostname":"<YOUR VROPS HOSTNAME HERE>"}
directory = /data/vcops/log/adapters/OpenAPIAdapter
include = *.log*
exclude_fields=hostname
event_marker=^\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}[\s]\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\,\d{3}

See what I mean about complex? And speaking of which… (come on, you had to know this was coming)

Today’s message has been brought to you by Talisman’s 2010 Adastra Vineyard Pinot Noir. The amazing folks at Talisman produce incredible small batch Pinot Noir from several vineyards across northern California. Their philosophy is to focus on the terroir of their fruit, so they produce every wine under precisely the same conditions – from crushing to aging to the oak in the barrels, everything is identical but the fruit itself. This allows the complexities afforded by each individual vineyard to really shine through. This is one of my favorites, with vanilla, dark fruit, spices and a nose that almost makes you forget to take a sip.

Talisman_2010_Adastra

Now. Once you’ve configured and restarted your Log Insight agents on the vRealize Operations Manager cluster nodes, all you have to do is import the Content Pack into Log Insight. It is available for direct download from the VMware Solution Exchange here, or you can install it directly from your Log Insight console by accessing the Content Pack Marketplace and selecting the VMware – vR Ops 6.x Content Pack.

Content_Pack_Marketplace

When that’s  complete, you’re ready to start leveraging the 12 Dashboard Groups, 81 Dashboard Widgets, 18 Queries, 8 Alerts and 31 Extracted Fields that this content pack exposes to you. Check it out!

Log_Insight_vRealize_Operations_Dashboards
(Click the image for a larger version)

It’s also worth noting that if you had previously configured vROps 6.0.x to send its logs to Log Insight directly by editing the logger configuration, you should now undo this configuration. Leaving it in place will result in some logs being sent to Log Insight twice, and may even confuse the content pack.

vRealize_Operations_Edit_Logger_Configuration

Cheers, and happy analyzing!

Extending vRealize Operations Actions with the vRealize Orchestrator Solution and Workflow Package

When vRealize Operations Management 6.0 was released, VMware increased the flexibility afforded to administrators by adding the concepts of symptoms, recommendations and actions to the product. As you might expect, symptoms are thresholds or characteristics that define when a problem may have occurred or additional guidance may be needed. Recommendations are a customizable way to define what that additional guidance might be – and actions allow you to automate and carry out that guidance.

Since then, one of the most frequent questions from my customers has been “When will we be able to use vRealize Orchestrator for these?”

I’m pleased to report that VMware has now enabled that capability via the vRealize Orchestrator Solution and Workflow Package for vRealize Operations. This package is available at the VMware Solution Exchange right now, and the purpose of this post is to guide you through the installation and configuration of it. The package adds many frequently-requested workflows, including:

  • Decommission a Host
  • Place a Host into Maintenance Mode
  • Perform a Power Off or Reboot on a Host
  • Manage VM or VM Group Snapshots
  • Migrate a VM or VM Group
  • Power Off, Power On or Reboot a VM or VM Group
  • Reconfigure a VM or VM Group (CPU and Memory settings)
  • Upgrade the VMware Tools for a VM or VM Group

Clicking the links above will bring you to the Solution Exchange portal where you can read more about and download the package. Click the blue “Try” button to initiate the download.

VSX_Download_vRealize_Orchestrator_Solution_and_Workflows_for_vRealize_Operations

Once you have downloaded and extracted the ZIP file, it’s time to start the installation. The first thing you’ll want to do is ensure that both your vRealize Orchestrator and vRealize Operations Manager are registered to the same vCenter instance. This can be done by comparing the data shown in the two screenshots below.

Validate_vRealize_Operations_vCenter_Connection

Validate _vRealize_Orchestrator_vCenter_Connection

As you can see above, both systems are taking to the same vCenter. We’re ready to begin!

First, you will need to import the Workflow package into your vRealize Orchestrator instance. Start by logging in to the Orchestrator Client.

Log_Into_vRealize_Orchestrator

Ensure that your client view is set to Administer

Switch_to_Administrator_View

Then, click on the Import Package button in the upper left of the right-hand panel.

Import_vRealize_Orchestrator_Package

Select the Remediation Actions Package (default filename is com.vmware.vrops.remediationactionsall-v15.package) and select Open

Select_Package_to_Import

You will be prompted to verify the software signature. Continue by selecting Import

Accept_Package_Signature

vRealize Orchestrator will then present you with a list of all of the new and changed elements that this package import will affect. No changes here are necessary, simply continue by clicking Import Selected Elements

Import_vRealize_Orchestrator_Package_Elements

Once the import completes, you will be able to view the new workflows. Click the Workflows tab to verify that there’s a whole bunch of new vRealize Operations Manager goodness present.

View_Imported_Workflows

You can also verify that the new workflows are present by switching back to the Run view, clicking the Workflows tab and expanding the new vRealize Operations Manager folder. You can see I already have a ton of great workflows by my friends Eric at Cloud Relevant and Sid at Daily Hypervisor in here.

Switch_to_Run_View_and_View_New_Workflows

That’s it for the vRealize Orchestrator side of things. Now you will need to switch over to your vRealize Operations Manager portal. Log in as a user with appropriate rights to add/update solutions. An admin user will work nicely.

Click on the Administration button, followed by the Solutions section. Then, click the Green + to add a new solution.

Import_New_vRealize_Operations_Solution

Select the solution file using the Browse button and click Upload. Once the upload completes and the PAK file has been verified, click Next to proceed with the installation.

Select_Solution_PAK

Accept the EULA and click Next again. Wait for the installation to complete, then select Finish

Complete_Solution_Installation

You can now verify that your new solution is installed by locating the vRealize Orchestrator Actions Adapter in the solutions list. Note that you may have to scroll down to find it, if you have several solutions installed. You may also notice that the adapter instance is not yet configured. Let’s tackle that next!

Verify_New_Solution_is_Installed

To configure the adapter instance, ensure that the vRealize Orchestrator Actions Adapter is still selected, then click the Gears icon at the top, next to the Green + we clicked a few steps back.

Give your new adapter a name, and enter the IP or hostname of your vRealize Orchestrator instance. Be sure to use the same Orchestrator instance as we verified at the beginning of this process. Click the Green + to add credentials for the instance.

Configure_New_vRealize_Operations_Solution

Enter your credentials and click OK

Add_New_Credential

Next, click Test Connection. You may be presented with a certificate warning – click OK if you trust the certificate, and then your test should be successful!

Accept_vRealize_Orchestrator_Certificate

Solution_Test_Successful

Save your new adapter by clicking Save Settings and finally Close the configuration dialog.

That’s it for the installation! You can verify that the new actions are present by clicking on the Content tab inside vRealize Operations and selecting Actions from the list on the left. If all went well, you should see the 8 new actions present. These can now be combined with symptoms and recommendations to unlock many new possibilities for remediation inside your environment.

View_New_Available_Actions
(Click for larger image)

Since it’s not even 9am yet, today’s post will be brought to you by the Zesty Bacon Bloody Mary from the Boon Fly Cafe in Napa, CA. This exceptional libation combines top-shelf Vodka with Boon Fly’s own special spice blend, a celery salt rim and a massive slab of applewood smoked bacon to top it all off. Paired with Boon Fly’s fresh made donuts, it’s the best breakfast in the valley. Bloody Marys also have the (dubious?) honor of being the drink that’s OK to have first thing in the morning. After all, you’re not an alcoholic, you’re just a little tired.

Bacon_Bloody_Mary_Boon_Fly_Cafe

I hope this guide has proved useful and that you have a chance to head out to Boon Fly and try their delicious concoctions.

 

Monitoring vRealize Automation with vRealize Operations and Hyperic

Have you ever deployed vRealize Automation? If so, then you know that it has a highly complex architecture, made up of dozens of individual components – and has historically been a bit of a hassle to properly monitor.

That said, there’s good news for administrators who have both the vRealize Automation and the vRealize Operations Advanced edition  – VMware has released a brand-new way to integrate the two, via the vRealize Automation Management Pack.  This new management pack brings detailed  application-aware monitoring of the full architecture of vRealize Automation, and includes a set of plugins for vRealize Hyperic as well as an updated vRealize Operations Management Pack for Hyperic. With the helo of this management pack and set of plugins, users gain the following capabilities:

  • vRealize Hyperic platform service monitoring for vRealize Automation related services
  • An inventory tree object in vRealize Operations Manager specifically tailored to vRealize Automation
  • A set of pre-defined symptoms, alerts, and recommendations for vRealize Operations specifically revolving around vRealize Automation monitoring

Before diving into implementation details, here are a couple of quick screenshots of what you can expect after deploying the new management pack and plugins.

vRealize Automation Environment View in vRealize Operations
(Click the above image for a larger version)

 

vRealize Automation Inventory Tree View in vRealize Operations

As you can see, it monitors the following high-level capabilities and their sub components :

  • vRealize Automation Appliance
  • vRealize Automation Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) Server
  • vRealize Business (Formerly ITBM) Appliance
  • vSphere Single Sign-On (SSO)
  • vRealize Orchestrator

Here’s today’s obligatory wine tie-in. Given to a friend when he departed the employ of Viansa, this bottle of 2005 Ossidiana was signed by his friends and co-workers from all aspects of the winery. It’s also a finely blended Bordeaux – representing the perfect marriage of the 5 noble French grapes. The blend is proprietary and not disclosed, but it was clearly more than a little Cab. All sorts of grapes, styles, workers, techniques and technology coming together to produce one harmonious and easily enjoyable product. Can you see why I was reminded of this exciting new marriage of Automation and Management when we opened this bottle last night?

IMG_4734

All that aside, let’s get into some of the nuts and bolts of implementing this new connection.

First, we must assume that you have functioning instances of vRealize Automation 6.1 or above, vRealize Operations Manager 6.0 or above and vRealize Hyperic deployed. Getting all of those up and running in your environment is outside the scope of this article. You will also need Hyperic agents deployed to all of the appliances and servers involved in the vRealize Automation  stack. These can include (but are not limited  to):

  • vSphere SSO
  • vRealize Automation Appliance
  • vRealize Orchestrator Appliance
  • vRealize Business Appliance
  • vRealize Automation Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) Server
  • Any additional Distributed Execution Managers (DEM)
  • External vRealize Automation IaaS Database Servers

Deploying these agents is also outside the scope of this article. Look for a forthcoming post on getting the agents onto the VMware appliances.

From there, you will log into your vRealize Hyperic server as an administrator with the rights to install plugins. Select the Administration tab and the Plugin Manager link.

Now, if you are currently running vRealize Hyperic 5.8.4, you may see some existing custom vRealize XML Plugins already present in the environment. These need to be removed first, and look like the following. If you don’t see these plugins, skip this step.

vRealize Hyperic XML Plugins for vRealize Monitoring
(Click the above image for a larger version)

To delete them, simply select the Checkbox to the left of each plugin and select Delete Selected Plugin(s) from the bottom left corner. This may take some time to complete.

Now click the Add/Update Plugin(s) button in the lower right corner and upload the two new .JAR plugin files.

After that’s complete, you should see something like the following image. Notice the two new custom JAR plugins, highlighted in red.

vRealize Hyperic JAR Plugins for vRealize Automation
(Click the above image for a larger version)

Now, switch over to your vRealize Operations console. Log in with a user who has the administrative rights to update solutions. Navigate to the Administration tab and select Solutions from the navigation pane. Click the Green + (Add) in the upper left corner of the solutions pane. Follow the wizard that is produced to install or update the solution.

vRealize Operations Solutions

If you already had the vRealize Hyperic solution installed and working, you’re done with this part! If this is your first time installing the solution, you will need to configure the adapter instance. To do so, highlight the vRrealize Hyperic solution and click on the Gears icon in the upper left. Fill in the requested details about your vRealize Hyperic server as seen here, of course using your own settings. Test and save the settings.

vRealize Hyperic Adapter Configuration

Now all you need to do is wait for vRealize Hyperic to auto-discover your new services. Check your Hyperic dashboard after a few minutes and import them; after a few more minutes they will start appearing in your vRealize Operations Manager.

You can confirm which vRealize Hyperic metrics are flowing into vRealize Operations by logging into it with an administrative account, then navigating to the Administration tab and Environment Overview. Expand the Adapter Instances and then your Hyperic Adapter Instance. You will see the name of the Hyperic instance that you configured in the last step – select it and view the related metrics.

vRealize Operations Manager Environment Overview
(Click the above image for a larger version)

That’s all there is to it – now you can navigate to your vRealize Operations Content tab and view the vRealize Automation inventory tree.

vRealize Operations Inventory Trees

From here you can explore the related tabs – environment, analysis, troubleshooting, etc – and begin leveraging the wealth of new metrics at your fingertips.

The new vRealize Operations and vRealize Hyperic integration packs can be downloaded from the VMware Solutions Exchange here and here.

Enjoy!

You can also see this article cross-posted on the VMware Management Blog at http://blogs.vmware.com/management/2015/02/monitoring-vrealize-automation-vrealize-operations-vrealize-hyperic.html